Vasectomy Info

Vasectomy is the procedure of dividing the vas (the tube that delivers the sperm from the testis to the prostate) in order to prevent conception. It is the most common method of male contraception in this country where about 500,000 vasectomies are done each year. Since vasectomy simply interrupts the delivery of the sperm, it does not change the hormonal function of the testis and sexual drive and ability remain intact. Since most of the semen is composed of fluid from the prostate, the semen will look the same. Vasectomy is thought to be free of known long term side effects, and is considered to be the safest and most reliable method of permanent male sterilization.

The technique of the No-scalpel Vasectomy was developed in 1974 by a Chinese physician, Dr. Li Shunqiang, and has been performed on over eight million men in China.

Local Anesthesia is administered with a special Jet spray device, with great ease and virtually no pain. The jet spray delivers the anesthetic medicine through the skin, without needle, deep into the scrotum. The feeling for the jet spray is that of a rubber snap.

After administering the scrotal skin and each vas with a local anesthetic, a special vas-fixation clamp is used to encircle and firmly secure the vas without penetrating the skin. One blade of a sharp forceps or clamp is then used to penetrate the scrotal skin. The tips of the forceps are spread, opening the skin much like spreading apart the weaves of fabric. The vas is thus exposed and then lifted out and occluded by any of the standard techniques, such as cautery or sutures. The second vas is then brought through the same opening and occluded in a similar fashion. The skin wound contracts to a few millimeters and usually does not require suturing.

Compared to the traditional incisional technique, the No-Scalpel Vasectomy usually takes less time, causes less discomfort and may have lower rates of bleeding and infection. Recovery following the procedure is usually complete in two to three days. Hard work or straining (athletic pursuits or heavy lifting ) is not recommended for seven days. Most patients should wait to have intercourse for a week after the procedure (You should feel no discomfort).